Events

Saturday, February 11, 2017, 6 p.m.
Retrospektice
Future Imperfect. Science · Fiction · Film

The Retrospective of the 67th Berlin International Film Festival was dedicated to science-fiction films, one of the most visual stunning and spectacular genres in the history of film. The movies portrayed imaginary worlds in an imperfect future, the way science-fiction films have conceived of them since the beginning. The section focused on two themes – the society of the future and the strange and alien. The accompanying English-language catalogue was published by Bertz + Fischer. Its authors – Aidan Power from University College in Cork and Matthias Schwartz from the Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung, Berlin (ZfL) – along with the Deutsche Kinemathek’s exhibition curator, Nils Warnecke, presented an overview of the themes of this year’s Retrospective. They discussed the thematic focal points and the films selected for the programme. Moderation by Connie Betz.

Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen,
Event room, 4th floor
In English, Admission free

 

Sunday, February 12, 2017, 6 p.m.
Retrospective
Alex McDowell – Building the World of MINORITY REPORT

For Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report (USA, 2002), production designer Alex McDowell designed the sets for a futuristic world, where crime was prevented before it happened by an elite police unit called “Precrime”. Even before the screenplay was finished, McDowell developed a concept for a cohesive future world – future reality, not science fiction –, in which preventative law enforcement influenced things as diverse as architecture, urban planning and social life. That interdisciplinary design became more than just a visual backdrop for the story of John Anderton, the head of the Precrime unit. It had a significant influence on the screenplay itself. The film marked a radical turn in Alex McDowell’s work as a production designer and gave birth to the “world building” concept as a design and narrative process, which he elucidated using Minority Report as an example.
McDowell’s impressive filmography includes productions such as The Lawnmower Man (USA 1992), The Crow (USA 1994), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (USA 1998), Fight Club (USA 1999) and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Australia/UK/USA 2005). In hiatus from his teaching and research work as a professor of practice at USC School of Cinematic Arts, he is currently designing Star Wars: Episode IX.

Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen,
Event room, 4th floor
In English, Admission free

 

Monday, February 13, 2017, 6 p.m.
Mediathek Fernsehen
Deutschland in Serie – 45 Jahre nach Acht Stunden sind kein Tag

A restored version of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s TV miniseries Acht Stunden sind kein Tag (Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day) was screened as part of the Berlinale Special section. Produced by the Westdeutscher Rundfunk broadcasting company (WDR), the series first aired in 1972/73. To open the event, the technical and thematic particulars of the five-part series were discussed by a panel made up of Juliane Lorenz of the Rainer Werner Fassbinder Foundation, Martin Wiebel, former dramatic advisor and commissioning editor for WDR and Saskia Walker, co-publisher of REVOLVER film magazine. Directly following that discussion, creators of current TV series talked about the development of the episodic format in Germany. Speakers include Philipp Leinemann, director of the ZDFneo series Tempel, Hans-Christian Schmid, director of Das Verschwinden, and Jörg Winger, producer of Deutschland 83. Moderation by Klaudia Wick, director of the audio-visual television heritage section of the Deutsche Kinemathek.
Acht Stunden sind kein Tag can also be viewed in its entirety in the “Mediathek Fernsehen” (Television Media Library) at the Deutsche Kinemathek.

Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen,
Event room, 4th floor
In German, Admission free

 

Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 6 p.m.
Retrospective
Weltall – Erde – Mensch. Die DEFA und ihre Science-Fiction-Filme

Although the science-fiction genre evokes first and foremost associations with the Anglo-American cultural realm, in Eastern Europe cinema increasingly tackled the endless vastness of space beginning in the 1960s as the “space race” between the USA and the USSR heated up. East German productions such as Signale – Ein Weltraumabenteuer (1970) and Im Staub der Sterne (1976) by Gottfried Kolditz, or the Retrospective’s opening night film, Eolomea (1972) directed by Herrmann Zschoche, depict their own version of the world of tomorrow. The panel discussed the peculiarities of science-fiction films made at DEFA, as well as the opportunities and limits to the genre at the studio. Heading the panel was Ralf Schenk (DEFA Foundation), speaking with director Herrmann Zschoche, cinematographer Peter Badel and screenwriter Stefan Kolditz.

Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen,
Event room, 4th floor
In German, Admission free

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